Ho Ho… Oh No!

And if you need more convincing…here’s a good read on more things that are wrong with Amazons drone delivery system

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Truthful Tuesday: Watch Out For That Flying Amazon Package

“We must cut labor” – That’s the dreadful phrase we’ve all heard from our bosses at some point no matter where we’ve worked. In every business, the number one goal is to make money and the second goal is to save that money. What’s the best way to do that? To cut labor. Nowadays, more companies are turning to technology to replace workers in order to cut labor costs. Amazon has recently turned to drones. Sure, this seems quick, efficient, andLaborCost way less costly, but it can’t be that easy, can it? No, it can’t.

Daniel Johnson lists nine ways how Amazons drone delivery tactic could go wrong in his article, Amazon Drones: Nine Ways it Could go Horribly Wrong and we’ve got to  agree with him. Johnson lists several safety issues such as the possibility that a package could become loose from a drone and fall. Not only would it suck for the person who ordered the package, but it could fall on a pedestrian and cause serious injuries. Technology isn’t perfect and trusting a machine to fly large (or even small) packages above our heads doesn’t strike us as the greatest of ideas.

Johnson goes on to describe some possible security issues with industrial drone use such as hacking and theft. His point here is that if people can hack phones and computers, what’s to stop them from hacking drones carrying expensive packages? Not to mention, people are more likely to steal packages from a machine than from a person so if we eliminate the human deliverer, more packages are susceptible to theft. If a person is determined enough, they could break the drone and steal the package. So basically, Amazon would be saving money on labor costs, but probably spending twice that amount replacing stolen packages and their own drones. Seems a little ADronecounterproductive if you ask us.

Johnson’s simplest, yet most practical argument is the weather. It wouldn’t be sensible to seize deliveries every time thunderstorms arrive. Human deliverers can drive in rain, but it would be difficult for a drone to fly in rain or even protect a package from the weather. Humans are absolutely necessary for the safe delivery of packages. Drones can’t guarantee this type of safety so cheaper doesn’t always mean better. The industrial use of drones can seem quick and cheap but the negatives quickly outweigh the positives.